List Of Agreements Between India And Pakistan

The Lahore Declaration (02-21-1999) Published by USIP Library on: February 23 1999 Source Name: Ministry of External Relations, Republic of India Source URL: www.meadev.gov.in/govt/lahore.htm Additional Source Name: Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Islamic Republic of Pakistan Additional Source URL: www.pak.gov.pk/govt/indiapak-talks.html#3 Date Downloaded: February 22, 1999 On December 22, 2000, a group of Terrorists from Lashkar-e-Toiba stormed new Delhi`s notorious Red Fort . The fort houses an Indian military unit and a high-security interrogation cell, used by both the Central Bureau of Investigation and the Indian Army. The terrorists managed to break the security cover around the Red Fort and opened fire on the indian military personnel on duty, two of whom were killed on the spot. The attack was significant because it took place only two days after the declaration of the ceasefire between India and Pakistan. [8] The agreement between India and Pakistan on the release and repatriation of persons detained in one of the two countries before the 1971 conflict is the first armed conflict between the two neighbors since they officially conducted nuclear tests. Afghanistan and Pakistan had their own historical rivalry around their border, the Durand Line, which many Afghan governments did not want to recognize as the border. This caused high tensions between the two countries and even military confrontations that led Pakistan to win. Pakistan has long accused Afghanistan of harboring Beloch separatist rebels and trying to promote separatist tendencies among its Pashtun and Beloch populations, dating back to the 1950s. It has been speculated that in the 1970s, then led by Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, Pakistan began supporting Islamist factions in Afghanistan in retaliation. [28] These factions have been rebellious to the Afghan government, which has kindly confessed to the Soviet Union and its revered South Asian India.

In August 2019, after the Indian parliament passed the reorganization of the Jammu and Kashmir Bill, which lifted the special status of Jammu and Kashmir,[13][14] new tensions were created between the two countries, with Pakistan lowering diplomatic relations, closing its airspace and suspending bilateral trade with India. [15] India and Pakistan, particularly northern India and East Pakistan, have, to some extent, similar cultures, cuisines and languages due to the common Indoarian heritage that extends over the two countries and much of the northern subcontinent, which also strengthens the historical ties between the two. Pakistani singers, musicians, comedians and artists enjoy great popularity in India, many of whom have distinguished themselves overnight in the Indian Bollywood film industry. Similarly, Indian music and cinema are very popular in Pakistan. Located in the northernmost region of South Asia, Pakistan is similar to the culture of northern India, especially in the northwest. Because of all these political differences, this land claim was the subject of wars between the two countries in 1947 and 1965 and limited conflict in 1999. . . .