Agreement Psi

Article 10(5) of the WTO Trade Facilitation Agreement provides that after the entry into force of the Agreement, developed and developing Members shall not, in accordance with their commitment plan, carry out preliminary verifications concerning tariff classification and customs value. In addition, the agreement encourages WTO members not to introduce or apply other new pre-shipment requirements. Discussion: Recent changes in the way trade agreements are negotiated have made it much more difficult for ISPs to participate in trade work. There has been an abandonment of the WTO multilateral negotiations, during which hundreds of countries have negotiated an agreement and information about the negotiations has been made public. Today, the proliferation of hundreds of separate negotiations conducted behind closed doors has changed the way civil society and PSI must work. Since the 2012 Congress, PSI has begun to reintegrate global NGOs, participated in the WTO Global Strategy Meeting at the World Social Forum (Tunis, March 2013) and the Planning Meeting for the Global Focus on the WTO Meeting in Bali. Psi facilitated the ISA meeting with global civil society. This work has shown that PSI`s traditional civil society partners are struggling to keep up with the fragmentation of trade agreements and many have stopped working. In this context, PSIs can no longer be limited to a series of wto negotiations; However, given limited resources and an exhausted base of NGO partners, it is very difficult to pursue several negotiations. The secrecy of trade negotiations outside the WTO exacerbates these problems. If we are to influence the relevant trade agreements for our subsidiaries, we need to focus our activities on the main threats and better involve and support our member organisations and civil society within the main interest groups. Given the resources of the PSI, our proposed action focuses on the following areas:Trade agreements between the EU and anotherThis work requires significant participation of the ESC with trade unions in the other country. The CEP works with Canadian member organizations to influence the EU-Canada agreement, and this experience will be useful for the upcoming US-EU negotiations.

This requires coordination between the US Member Organisations and the ESC, as well as with the ETUC and the AFL-CIO, which are developing a common position. It will also be important to react to the free trade agreement between Guatemala and Colombia with the EU, as violence against trade unions and trade union rights is taken into account in both countries where IPR measures are often needed. Agreements are also underway with Japan and African countries. The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) The TPP proposes to cover a wide range of issues, including investment, intellectual property rights, liberalization of services, including financial services and public procurement. The parties are currently Australia, Brunei, Chile, Canada, Mexico, Peru, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore, the United States and Vietnam – with Japan interested in accession. Psi must coordinate between the countries of America and Asia-Pacific. In early 2012, some 20 WTO members (of which the EU is considered a member), who called themselves “good friends of services” (RGF), began secret unofficial discussions on the possibility of an international agreement to further liberalise trade in services, including public services. . . .